comments

Knowing the score on Rocklin’s Troy Schafer

Tri-City Little League honors fallen coach on field’s new scoreboard
By: Lauren Weber, The Placer Herald
-A +A
Troy Schafer will always be remembered on the baseball field. His name was recently etched onto a new scoreboard for the Tri-City Little League and a ceremony was held last Thursday in Rocklin in his honor, less than a year after his tragic death. Schafer was involved in a train accident in July 2008 when he was struck and killed by a light rail train while working on the tracks. Schafer was a Sacramento Regional Transit District employee. Allison McGraph, a family friend, met Schafer through little league. When the league received new scoreboards, she said they jumped at the opportunity to remember Schafer – McGraph said it’s pretty unusual to dedicate a scoreboard after a community member. But Schafer’s dedication to the league made it a simple decision. “He was a board member, coach, umpire, fan,” McGraph said. Following the dedication ceremony, Schafer’s two sons, Kyle, 12 and Jason, 10, played the first baseball game underneath the scoreboard named after their father. “We wanted to show them how special he was to the league,” McGraph said. Schafer was a Tri-City Little League coach for approximately six years and coached both of his sons, Troy Schafer’s wife, Donna Schafer, said. “He was very caring and very knowledgeable. His main thing was it was all about the kids,” Donna said. “It’s a huge honor. It just kind of goes to show his dedication to the league.” Donna said she was surprised with the turnout for the dedication with friends and family who have been her support system since her husband’s death. Donna said with the help of the community of Rocklin, it has made each day more bearable. The red, black, white and gold scoreboard on the league’s home baseball field off Third Street in Rocklin reads: “Home of Tri-City Little League, In Memory of Coach Troy Schafer.” “He would be so honored, just amazed,” Donna said. “I think he would be surprised about the affect he had on other people.”